Writing Exercise #11 – Part B

Point-Of-View Exercise – Part B

Introduction ~

In each of the four components of this part of the exercise you will use the same personal characteristics as you used in Part A of this exercise (Here) to introduce yourself. However, this time you will be writing from different Points-Of-View.

Part A was written from the 1st Person Point-Of-View (POV) – from your own perspective (using ‘I’ or ‘we’ – speaking about yourself).

Part B (a) and (b) are to be written from the 2nd Person POV (using ‘You’ – to address you directly).

Part B (c) and (d) are to be written from the 3rd Person POV (using ‘He’ ‘She’ ‘They’ – another person speaking about you).

 

 Instructions ~

Part B (a)Write from the 2nd Person POV – Using the same characteristics you identified in Part A as describing yourself, write a piece of up to 100 words about you from the perspective of a parent or parent figure.

Part B (b)Write from the 2nd Person POV – Using the same characteristics you identified in Part A as describing yourself, write a piece of up to 100 words about you from the perspective of your worst enemy. If you don’t know of any enemies, imagine you have one and what they would say about you using your stated characteristics.

Part B (c)Write from the 3rd Person POV – Using the same characteristics you identified in Part A as describing yourself, write a piece of up to 100 words about you from the perspective of your best friend.

Part B (d)Write from the 3rd Person POV – Using the same characteristics you identified in Part A as describing yourself, write a piece of up to 100 words about you from the perspective of a biographer one hundred years from now.

Try to get into the spirit of this exercise by imagining you are the person from whose perspective each piece is written. Write from their attitudes, thought processes, and how they would express themselves.

By the end of this exercise you will have experienced the same information [your own characteristics from Part A of this exercise (Here)] from three different Points-Of-View. Notice how the same information can bring different results from different characters and different Points-Of-View. For example, it’s not unusual for ‘shy’ to be interpreted as ‘aloof’ ‘stuck up’ or ‘judgemental’, depending on who is making the observation and what frame of mind they are in.

Writing Exercise #11 – Part A

Point-Of-View Exercise – Part A

Close your eyes and think about the characteristics that make you uniquely you. Don’t concentrate only on the physical… go deeper… and deeper… until you reach the essence of who you are – your likes, dislikes, values, attitudes, what is important to you, how you approach things – and so on, and so on…

Jot these down, and keep going until you feel you have reached your inner self.

Having clarified who you are at a very deep level; set aside your notes.

Write a piece that introduces you to the reader. Write from your own perspective (‘I…’) as you would if you were speaking directly to a person or a group of people.

Don’t exaggerate or be too modest. Be clear, precise and honest. Remember, no one but you will see what you write, unless you want them to…

The word limit for this exercise is 100 words. You won’t fit everything about yourself into this number of words, but if you follow the directions above the most-characteristically-you items will be included.

This exercise is Part A of a five component Point-Of-View exercise. It will be used as a foundation for the next exercise I post.

(Exercise #11 – Part B)

Writing Exercise #10

An Overheard Comment

Jot down a snippet of a conversation that grabs your attention while going about your daily activities. You may hear it as you pass a group of people chatting in the street, while waiting in the bank or in the queue at a ticket office, or on a crowded bus or train… or anywhere…

Just a few words can be enough, though longer will work just as well. Whatever the length of what you hear, it will surely be something that intrigues you or takes you to a memory or sets your imagination on fire.

You are not necessarily going to write about what you heard. Instead, your task is to write something that is stimulated by what you have heard or the experience of overhearing it. What you write may not be directly related to the words you caught, but it will be something that comes directly from within you.

Begin writing whatever comes to you and see where it leads. It may take any form… poetry, prose, 1st 2nd or 3rd person, past or present tense…

Whatever it is, keep writing until you feel satisfied you have captured a gem that otherwise may not have begged to be written.

In writing courses, I ask students for a maximum of three hundred words to allow time for processing at the following class session. However, there is no word limit here.

This exercise is related to Writing Tip #3 and Writing Tip #11.

Writing Exercise #9

Reflect On Your Writing Year

An important part of goal-setting is to reflect on what has been before. Recognition of what has been achieved and identifying what hasn’t, gives a foundation for new direction.

Take some time to explore your writing year by thoughtfully answering the following questions:

  • Did you achieve all the writing activities you wanted to during 2016?
  • Or are there writing projects unattempted, partly-finished and put aside, or relegated to the bin?
  • Are the projects you wanted to complete, but didn’t, still relevant?
  • Does your passion still burn for these projects?

If your achievements fell short of your dreams, consider why this may be…

  • Why were some hopes fulfilled and not others?
  • What made these more achievable?
  • Were your hopes too big for your circumstances?
  • Did other commitments overshadow your writing endeavours?
  • Are there strategies that could have been implemented to assist your attempts to meet your goals?

Your journey through these questions will give you insight into your writing life, which will be invaluable when you move on to set achievable goals for your writing in 2017 – per my next blog.

This exercise is related to my blog ~ Preparing To Set Writing Goals That Can Succeed and Writing Tip #10.

Writing Exercise # 8

Why Write?  

Write a one-page outline of your reasons for writing…

Over the years, I’ve asked many beginning writers why they want to write and established writers what drives them to write.

The answers are many and varied, because writing is such a personal journey. However, most responses fit under the following headings:

  • For myself
  • For family and friends
  • For others
  • To be famous
  • Because I have something to say
  • I have specific messages for others
  • For money/career
  • I feel the need/compulsion to write

Identifying with one of these reasons does not necessarily exclude all the others, and you may have several reasons for writing. Likewise, your reasons may change over time.

The notion behind this exercise is that it is important for you to know what is driving you to write at any given time.

(Related to Writing Tip #9 – here)

Writing Exercise #7

What Kind Of Writer Are You?

There are no right or wrong answers to the question ‘What kind of writer are you?’ However, knowing the answer yourself will help you to work with the writer in you and make the most of your attributes and skills.

Get to know the writer in you by answering the following questions – and any others you would like to add for yourself. Further questions can be asked over time if you find this helpful.

The idea is to provoke thought and to assist you to understand the way you approach your writing.

There are not always definitive answers to these questions, but asking them of yourself will remind you of your most likely way of working as a writer. There will be grey areas and your focus may shift over time.

Begin with these questions…

Are you a spontaneous writer, who writes when the mood takes you?

Or, a structured writer, who sets aside specific times for writing?

Do you write to a plan, or go with the flow of how your work evolves?

Do you take notes, or trust your memory?

Do you carry notebooks, or jot ideas on scraps of paper, old receipts or anything else you can lay your hands on in the moment?

Do you only write when you’re alone, or can you write anywhere, anytime?

Are you a night writer, or a morning writer?

Do you write one piece of work at a time, or have several projects on the go at once?

What stimulates your creative juices?

Writing Exercise #6

Finding The Writer In You

Part A:

Take a piece of paper and brainstorm your history as a writer – regardless of how small you think that history is. We all had experiences of words and writing at school – spelling, reading, compositions, school magazines and so on. For various reasons, some of us struggled more than others with these, but we all have our own story to tell (see my recent blog posts on my childhood experiences – here).

Begin by listing your school experiences, then add other writing endeavours… letters (to family, friends, pen-friends…), poetry, stories, university essays, work reports, letters to the editor, competitions… whatever it is for you. Keep digging deeper and deeper – you may be surprised what you remember.

Part B:

Read through your list and then set it aside.

Part C:

Write the words, ‘I know I am a writer because…’ and then keep writing without censoring what flows onto the paper. Continue until you feel you’ve exhausted the subject.

You may end up with a dot-point paragraph, a page, or several pages. Everyone’s result will be different, but this doesn’t matter – what you are looking for, and what you will find, is your own unique experience.

This is the foundation on which to build your writing future.

Writing Exercise #5

Object Exercise (2)                                                                           

Begin by making a decision that, over the next few days, an object that will be the inspiration for this exercise will present itself to you. When it does, write a piece stimulated by that object.

The writing may be about the object itself, something or someone connected with the object, where it came from, your acquisition of it… or anything else about it that stirs in you.

Do not rush into this exercise. When I’ve set it for homework in weekly writing classes, some students have reported the inclination to rush around looking for an object to write about. However, the challenge here is to allow the object to call out to you, so to speak, to encourage you to go beyond the obvious.

Don’t worry that nothing will present itself. It will, and you will intuitively know when the moment has come to start writing.

Exercise #4

Object Exercise (1)                                                                          

Sit ready to write, either at your computer or with a notebook and pen. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths to clear your mind.

When you feel ready, open your eyes and take in your surroundings.

Allow your gaze to rest on one object, then start writing a piece about that object and see where it takes you.

 

 

Exercise #3

First Memory                                                                             

Go back in your mind to the scene that you think of as the earliest one that has stayed with you. Jot down everything you remember about the event. Where were you? Was anyone else there? Who? What were the sounds, colours, textures or movements around you? Was there conversation? If so, who said what? Can you smell anything? And so on…

Explore the memory in as much detail as you can, and write it as though you’re sharing it with someone special.